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  • Alert:

    Wayne County Schools closed until April 20 due to Governor's recommendation. These days will be NTI days. 

  • Alert:

    Wayne County Schools closed until April 20 due to Governor's recommendation. 

  • Alert:

    Wayne County Schools closed until April 20 due to Governor's recommendation. 

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Tech students rally around real life cause to fight cancer

green clover leaf pin produced by the students

Andrew Worley and Trevor Hammond working on pins

Senior Andrew Worley and Sophomore Trevor Hammond adding the back pins to the cloverleaf designs.

Cloverleaf pins

A stack of clover leaf pins drying before sold

Sophomore Collin Morrow designs a poster

Sophomore Collin Morrow designing a poster to market the product the class is producing.

Collin Morrow pulls off a poster hot off the press

Collin Morrow pulling out the finished poster hot off the press.

Help Desk Station where student Chromebooks are worked on

Tech Design Teacher Marsha Bertram working with Tech Supporter Danny Shelton and Senior Landon Denney repairing student Chromebooks.

Preparing daily announcements

Jared Burke and Carlos Ajanel working on morning announcements that will be displayed on television monitors, especially helpful to virtual students who may not hear the morning announcements because they follow a non-traditional schedule.

Designers stay busy creating drawings

Students working in the design department are (l-r) Tim Schaefer and Luis Balmori.

Junior Chloe Driggers working on a design

Junior Chloe Driggers is working on a design.

Green Screen station teaches students advanced techniques

John David Rains is working with Senior Mallory Brumley at the Green Screen station.

Two of the 3D printers in the lab

3D Printers are producing the cloverleaf designs after much thought has gone into the production.

3D printer at work in the lab

Hot off the press cloverleaf designs made on the 3D printers.

Cloverleaf finished product

 

Tech students rally around real life cause to fight cancer

 

                Wayne County High School students have produced some unique items this year in Marsha Bertram’s Tech Design entrepreneurial class. However, their latest project designing cloverleaf pins comes from the heart.

                With their instructor making a wonderful comeback from a very serious bout with cancer earlier this school year, the students have enthusiastically embraced their project “Clovers for Cures” since half of the proceeds will go to the school’s Relay for Life Club to fight cancer. Their mission is to produce 500 pins and sell them as a fundraiser.

                The students have begun manufacturing the plastic pins on the four 3D printers in their classroom. But, before they got to the 3D printer stage, they had to plan and agree on the design of the clover leaves. They determined the iridescent green color based on eight different filament shade choices of green. The size and the placement of the cancer fighting ribbon had to be determined, as well. Everyone in the class took a turn at designing the pin on the computers.

                WCHS Sophomore Tim Schaefer, who was working with classmate Luis Balmori at the design station explained that they first worked in a software program called Selva3D transforming images into 3D models online. Once they found the clip art graphic, they used Tinkercad to import the image and customize it into the specific 3D form they needed.

                The students have also learned how to market their products. “We use Canva (software program) to make up posters to help us sell t-shirts for causes or to promote whatever we are making in here,” said Junior Chloe Driggers. “We’ve made posters for ACT rewards,” for instance.

                Sophomore Collin Morrow was busy at another station where he was printing large colored posters that they had designed complete with graphics and wording in various fonts and point sizes. They planned to hang the posters in the high school hallways.

                At still another station, two students were preparing the daily announcements for the television monitors inside the high school. The monitors are especially helpful to virtual students with non-traditional schedules, who do not hear the announcements read over the loud speaker at the start of the school day each morning.

                One of the newest features in the lab-like setting is a green screen where students are learning advanced editing techniques. John David Rains particularly enjoyed shooting a photo of classmate Bryson Slaven and then transposing his head shot by using DoInk onto all of his classmates’ bodies in a random classroom photo.

                On the other side of the room, Technology Aide Danny Shelton had Landon Denney at the Help Desk repairing or updating students’ rental chrome books.

                Once the new Area Technology Center opens, the class will be moved to that location. In the fall, a new dual credit class, collaborating with Somerset Community College will allow students to get both high school and college credit while learning to design and produce 3D images.  They will be creating products and working on specific design elements beyond what Tech Design does.    The new room will boast six 3D printers.

              The clover product for this year’s Tech Design is the latest in a line of projects, which include everything from plastic roses for Valentine’s Day to Christmas ornaments. They have made very practical items like a small part for a feed bin that the agriculture teacher needed when a piece of his farm equipment broke. Fellow tech design student Savannah Ramsey designed tags in the shape of tennis balls that were monogrammed with names for the entire girls tennis team to use to label their sports equipment.

             The “Clovers for Cures” is somewhat of a schoolwide project.  Students charge $2.00 per pin with the Tech Design class receiving a $1 for their materials, while the Relay for Life Club receives the other half of the proceeds. Their teacher has challenged them to sell 500 pins, so early this week they were producing one pin after another hot off the 3D printer with students using a hot glue gun to attach the pin to the back of the cloverleaf.

             If any local businesses are interested in joining this worthwhile fundraiser, they may contact the high school to place a group order at 348-5575 or school personnel can go to the staff button on the school district website and go to the Tech Design Class website page. 

 





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