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Reality Town held at Middle School each school year

Student crowd in the middle school gym

    Some finished in the hole, while others came out in the black. But, none of the students had tons of money to burn. Instead, it was an at school wake-up call in the form of an economics lesson to prepare them for adulthood.

     The annual Reality Town is a mock event where students are provided an occupation and monthly salary. It is up to them how to spend their paycheck wisely at a variety of booths. The Wayne County Middle School eighth graders soon found out how things like taxes, insurance, mortgages, and vehicles take a toll on what seemed to be a sizable amount of money each month.

      WCMS student Jason Woodworth was assigned to be a funeral home director and he had $668 left in his budget by the end of the month. But, his friend Cameren Dople’s occupation was a cable installer and he only had $157 left in his account. He complained about taxes taking up a big chunk of his paycheck.

      Eighth grader Steven Foster said, “I wanted to be a doctor so they’d pay me a lot.” But, he was cast as a musician instead making $1,667 per month.

      Another student visiting the 'Chance Booth' facilitated by former WCMS Counselor Karen Guffey drew a card and found out his vehicle had blown a gasket and unfortunately he would have to spend money on repairs.   

      So, the students got a lesson in the range of salaries from different fields. Hopefully, they took the exercise to heart and have a better understanding of what their parents go through each month. Most importantly, it was one more of their teachers’ tools designed to inspire them to become more focused on learning and trying to be the best they can be.

      Thanks to local businesses who provided employees to work at a variety of booths to give students' a glimpse into the adult world. The WCMS Family Resource Center and 21st Century program coordinated and supported this worthwhile special event.

One of the students was assigned to be a musician and would get paid $1,667 per month

WCMS student Alisson Perez, who was first in line, was assigned to be a computer programmer at a salary of $3,334 per month. Students were assigned different occupations with a variety of salaries. For example, Steven Foster Jr. was next in line and was assigned to be a musician and would get paid $1,667 per month.

8th grader London Anderson was assigned to be a Family Practitioner

8th grader London Anderson was assigned to be a Family Practitioner so she was making monthly purchases based on her income. 

Breanna Rood at the Furniture Booth

Breanna Rood purchased furniture from Lisa Perkins at the Furniture Booth

Wayne County Middle School Counselor Vicki Davis worked the SOS/Supplemental Income booth

Wayne County Middle School Counselor Vicki Davis worked the SOS/Supplemental Income booth 

Halla McCutchen purchased products at the Health/Grooming booth ran by Gage Gregory

Halla McCutchen purchased products at the Health/Grooming booth facilitated by Gage Gregory

Danika Troxell went to the Insurance booth

Leah Turner helps Danika Troxell select an insurance policy at the Insurance booth

Student goes to the Chance Booth ran by Karen Guffey and happens to have his car blow a gasket

A student at the Chance Booth operated by former Middle School Counselor Karen Guffey, learned the unfortunate news that his car blew a gasket and now needed repairs.

Students who completed their rotation in Reality Town relax on the bleachers in the middle school gym

Students who completed their rotation in Reality Town relax on the bleachers in the middle school gym

Jason Woodworth who was a funeral director and Caleb Dople Tucker who was a cable installer turned in their papers to Diana Kennedy who told them how much money they had left.

(l-r:) Jason Woodworth who was a funeral director and Cameren Dople who was a cable installer turned in their papers to Instructional Assistant Diana Kennedy who checked to see how much money they had left.





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