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Deadlines quickly approaching for applications to The Center of Rural Development's Youth Program Grades 8-12

Emma Carter graduates for the Roger's Scholar program

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rogers scholar

Allison Cross, Community Liaison and Youth Programs Coordinator Allison Cross spoke to former Rogers Explorer/ELI participant John David Rains about Rogers Scholar opportunities at The Center during a visit to the high school this past semester. Cross visited the students to extend an invitation to apply for their youth programs and explain all the details.

rogers scholar

(l-r) Shaylie Dobbs (Rogers Explorer), Kennedy Keith (Rogers Explorer), Miriah Bowlin (Rogers Explorer) , Nicole Hesse (Rogers Explorer, ELI, Rogers Scholar, and Governors Scholar), Emma Carter (Rogers Explorer, Rogers Scholar), John David Rains (ELI, and Rogers Explorer), Aaron Hesse (Rogers Explorer), and Youth Program Coordinator Allison Cross are all advocates for The Center's Youth Programs.

rogers scholar

WCHS students (l-r:) Raegan Hadley, Preston Reynolds, William Beckley, and Andrew Lair asked Allison Cross questions about educational programs being offered through The Center after her presentation.

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Lonnie Lawson, President and CEO of The Center for Rural Development, and Allison Cross, Community Liaison and Youth Programs Coordinator for The Center, present 2019 Rogers Scholars graduate Emma Carter with a certificate for completing the program. She is a junior at Wayne County High School.

Wayne County High School student Emma Carter graduated this summer from The Center for Rural Development’s 2019 Rogers Scholars program.

Rogers Scholars—The Center’s flagship youth program—is an intensive one-week summer program that provides valuable leadership skills and exclusive college scholarship opportunities for high school students in Southern and Eastern Kentucky to help seize their potential as the region’s next generation of business and entrepreneurial leaders.

The program was established through the vision of U.S. Congressman Harold “Hal” Rogers (KY-05) that “no young person should have to leave home to find his or her future.”

Carter attended the first of two summer sessions of the Rogers Scholars program held June 9-14 on the campus of Lindsey Wilson College.

“We have had another incredible year with the Rogers Scholars program. Students from throughout Southern and Eastern Kentucky have come together to build their leadership and entrepreneurial skills and focus on community service to make their communities, and this region, a better place to live,” said Lonnie Lawson, President and CEO of The Center for Rural Development. “I cannot wait to see what the future holds for this talented young group of leaders.” 

Carter is the daughter of Shannon and Kellie Carter of Monticello.

Sixty-five high school students from 45 Kentucky counties were selected to attend the 2019 Class of Rogers Scholars. Each graduate earns potential access to exclusive college scholarship opportunities from some of the state’s top-ranked colleges and universities. To be eligible, students must complete a community service project in their hometown within one year after completing the Rogers Scholars program. 

There is no tuition charge to attend Rogers Scholars and lodging and food are provided at no cost to participants.

For more information about the Rogers Scholars program, contact Allison Cross, Community Liaison and Youth Programs Coordinator at The Center, at across@centertech.com or call 606-677-6019. Visit www.centeryouthprograms.com to learn more about the program.

 

Wayne County High School student Emma Carter graduated this summer from The Center for Rural Development’s 2019 Rogers Scholars program. Rogers Scholars—The Center’s flagship youth program—is an intensive one-week summer program that provides valuable leadership skills and exclusive college scholarship opportunities for high school students in Southern and Eastern Kentucky to help seize their potential as the region’s next generation of business and entrepreneurial leaders.  The program was established through the vision of U.S. Congressman Harold “Hal” Rogers (KY-05) that “no young person should have to leave home to find his or her future.”  Carter attended the first of two summer sessions of the Rogers Scholars program held June 9-14 on the campus of Lindsey Wilson College.  “We have had another incredible year with the Rogers Scholars program. Students from throughout Southern and Eastern Kentucky have come together to build their leadership and entrepreneurial skills and focus on community service to make their communities, and this region, a better place to live,” said Lonnie Lawson, President and CEO of The Center for Rural Development. “I cannot wait to see what the future holds for this talented young group of leaders.”  Carter is the daughter of Shannon Carter and Kellie Carter of Monticello. Sixty-five high school students from 45 Kentucky counties were selected to attend the 2019 Class of Rogers Scholars. Each graduate earns potential access to exclusive college scholarship opportunities from some of the state’s top-ranked colleges and universities. To be eligible, students must complete a community service project in their hometown within one year after completing the Rogers Scholars program.   There is no tuition charge to attend Rogers Scholars and lodging and food are provided at no cost to participants. For more information about the Rogers Scholars program, contact Allison Cross, Community Liaison and Youth Programs Coordinator at The Center, at across@centertech.com or call 606-677-6019. Visit www.centeryouthprograms.com to learn more about the program. Established in 1996 through the vision of U.S. Congressman Harold "Hal" Rogers, (KY-05), and other leaders, The Center for Rural Development is a nonprofit organization fueled by a mission to provide leadership that stimulates innovative and sustainable economic development solutions and a better way of life in Southern and Eastern Kentucky. In its 45-county primary service region, The Center provides innovative programs in leadership, public safety, technology, and arts and culture. The Center is committed to constantly expanding its capabilities in order to deliver a range of key services throughout Kentucky and the nation.

2018 Rogers Scholar Nicole Hesse, a senior at Wayne County High School, organized a sock drive for her Rogers Scholars community service project. She collected well over 343 new pairs of socks and made donations to the Wayne County School District’s Family Resource Centers, Dishman’s Nursing Home, Golden Years Nursing Home, HELP Pregnancy Center, and Monticello Head Start. Hesse is a senior at Wayne County High School.

 

2018 Rogers Scholar Nicole Hesse of Wayne County organized a sock drive to help support students and organizations in her community.

 

Nicole Hesse, a graduate of The Center for Rural Development’s Rogers Scholars program, partnered with students and staff at Wayne County High School on a local sock drive for her Rogers Scholars community service project.

“One worry that concerned me most was trying to find something that would be financially affordable for those to donate in my rural area,” said Hesse, a senior at Wayne County High School. “High school students struggle to pay for bills, gas, college classes, and social activities, and I knew that putting in one more expense would make-or-break who donated. Socks seemed like the easiest thing for students to buy that would not take down a student’s next paycheck, while still providing an important need in our community.”

Hesse collected well over 343 new pairs of socks. She made donations to the Wayne County School District’s Family Resource Centers, Dishman’s Nursing Home, Golden Years Nursing Home, HELP Pregnancy Center, and Monticello Head Start.

As an incentive to donate to the Wayne County Sock Drive, the name of each donor was entered for a chance to win a complimentary pair of Oakley sunglasses donated by Vision Care. 

“Wayne County High School is so proud of Nicole and the effort she put in the sock drive,” said principal Justin Alley. “Nicole is an amazing student that cares deeply about Monticello and Wayne County. Her efforts will go a long way to provide much needed socks to those in need.”

“Seeing the light in the eyes of those receiving the donations, those who donated, and those affected by these donations truly left me humbled and eager to help more people,” added Hesse. “This simple gesture left my heart full and made every hardship, obstacle, and challenge well worth it.” 

Hesse is the daughter of Matt and Emily Hesse of Monticello.

Each Rogers Scholars graduate is required to complete a community service project within one year after completing the program.

Established in 1996 through the vision of U.S. Congressman Harold "Hal" Rogers, (KY-05), and other leaders, The Center for Rural Development is a nonprofit organization fueled by a mission to provide leadership that stimulates innovative and sustainable economic development solutions and a better way of life in Southern and Eastern Kentucky. In its 45-county primary service region, The Center provides innovative programs in leadership, public safety, technology, and arts and culture. The Center is committed to constantly expanding its capabilities in order to deliver a range of key services throughout Kentucky and the nation.

 

Click here for more information regarding the Youth Programs





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