Open vision bar

Students can follow a biomedical science career pathway at WCHS

High school students dissecting in Project Lead the Way Science classes

Students can follow a biomedical science career pathway at WCHS

      You might think you are in a medical laboratory at a hospital when you step into Kelly Brown’s classroom at Wayne County High School. Students might be clad in white lab coats wearing gloves, using the same tools as the professionals doing precise work at their station.

       Students may be dissecting a sheep’s eyeball or brain, modeling the role of a medical professional, building organs or tissues on a skeletal manikin, working independently or in a group.

       Students who are serious about their courses and have plans for their future appreciate the rigorous courses that Brown teaches like: Chemistry, Honors Biology, AP Biology, and Dual Credit Biology through Campbellsville University.

       Her Project Lead the Way (PLTW) elective courses are considered advanced and enhance what students have already learned through their required Science courses, however, they do not offer college credits or advanced placement. The PLTW classes - Principles of Biomedical Science, Human Body Systems and Medical Interventions - can be scheduled during their four years of high school. They are for students with an interest in science or the medical field.

      “Students who are successful in PLTW classes are responsible, motivated, and self-driven learners with good time management skills,” said Brown.  

        Her students are always engaged in interesting activities and challenging their brains to understand how things work, so they can find solutions to problems. Students can be found reporting the results of their experiments in binders as they work together through assignments and gather data. The assignments relate to real-world-challenges as they study in-depth concepts.

        She also wears the hat of a digital learning coach at the high school, so she frequently uses her technology skills providing digital lessons that appear on a screen in front of the classroom. During virtual learning, her website was used to route students through her videoed presentations and assignments, just like the rest of the instructors did on campus using Google Classroom. There can never be enough said to commend local teachers’ efforts and lengths they went to in trying to reach their students and keeping on pace with their syllabuses during the pandemic. Now that in-person learning has resumed, the advanced technology skills that were acquired by teachers are incorporated into the tools they use on a daily basis in classrooms. That experience is one of the few positives that have resulted from the pandemic. 

Dissecting sheep brains - helps students learn about the human brain through parallels with a sheep's brain

(l-r) Brayleigh Butcher and Hayden Lewis dissect sheep brains

(l-r) Brayleigh Butcher and Hayden Lewis dissect sheep brains 

AP Science teacher Kelly Brown explains the different parts of the brain the students are looking at

PLTW Science teacher Kelly Brown explains the different parts of the brain the students are examining

(front-back) Brayleigh Butcher and Zoe Jones

(front-back) Brayleigh Butcher and Zoe Jones

Brain power point

Power point slide of the different parts of the brain 

(l-r) Myla Massengale and Zoe Jones

(l-r) Myla Massengale and Zoe Jones

Kelly Brown goes over dissection with students

Teacher Kelly Brown goes over dissection with students

Brayleigh Butcher cuts open her sheep's brain

Brayleigh Butcher cuts open her sheep's brain 

close up of sheep's brain

Close up of sheep's brain being cut up by a student 





Back to School News       Print